in particular

Mar 13

[video]

Oct 22


Downton’s Favorite Drama Queen!

Downton’s Favorite Drama Queen!

(via fuckingdownton)

Sep 13

SIGH

SIGH

(via scout)

Aug 30

jamesnord:

I saw this couple last night in Bryant Park and asked them if I could snap their photo. After showing them the results, I sat down for a chat. The first leaves were shaking themselves off the trees in the strong breeze and I asked what the occasion for their picturesque picnic was figuring an anniversary or birthday. The man put his cards down and smiled at me saying, “I have been married to the best girl in the world for 30 years, I am doing my best to make sure she knows that.”

jamesnord:

I saw this couple last night in Bryant Park and asked them if I could snap their photo. After showing them the results, I sat down for a chat. The first leaves were shaking themselves off the trees in the strong breeze and I asked what the occasion for their picturesque picnic was figuring an anniversary or birthday. The man put his cards down and smiled at me saying, “I have been married to the best girl in the world for 30 years, I am doing my best to make sure she knows that.”

(via npr)

Aug 20

flawsonscreek:


Just one 15-year-old to another, mixing alliteration and psychoanalysis the way the rest of us mixed malt liquor and shame. 

flawsonscreek:

Just one 15-year-old to another, mixing alliteration and psychoanalysis the way the rest of us mixed malt liquor and shame. 

(via scout)

Jun 21

kmnml:

Seeing this fabulous broad on Friday night.  So into it.

Jealous and also had no idea she was a blonde. Totally different than how I pictured and even more adorable.

kmnml:

Seeing this fabulous broad on Friday night.  So into it.

Jealous and also had no idea she was a blonde. Totally different than how I pictured and even more adorable.

May 21

[video]

May 18

braiker:

well played
flavorpill:

Yes.

braiker:

well played

flavorpill:

Yes.

(via npr)

May 02

oh, hello

oh, hello

(Source: ramblersbone, via awelltraveledwoman)

Apr 26

theatlantic:

The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture

One of the clearest regional differences in the U.S. can found by tracking the words people use to refer to soft drinks, which is in fact the map you saw at the top of this story. Pop or soda, or even Coke, these small linguistic differences are not as small as we might think. While “soda” commands the Northeast and West Coast (green) and “pop” is in between (black), “Coke” reigns in the south (turquoise). These small distinctions can often act as touchstones for larger cultural differences.
Read more. [Image: Samuel Arbesman]

theatlantic:

The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture

One of the clearest regional differences in the U.S. can found by tracking the words people use to refer to soft drinks, which is in fact the map you saw at the top of this story. Pop or soda, or even Coke, these small linguistic differences are not as small as we might think. While “soda” commands the Northeast and West Coast (green) and “pop” is in between (black), “Coke” reigns in the south (turquoise). These small distinctions can often act as touchstones for larger cultural differences.

Read more. [Image: Samuel Arbesman]

(via npr)

Apr 23

“Block paints Los Angeles in late-eighties’ Rococo: Patrick Nagel doing the Go-Gos in dayglo. In Weetzie Bat, Los Angeles is a city in which “everyone was always young and lit up like a movie, palm trees turned into tropical birds, Marilyn-blonde angels flew through the spotlight rays, the cars were the color of candied mints and filled with lovers making love as they drove down the streets paved with stars that had fallen from the sky.” Block’s prose style is impressionistic mini-maximalism; she blurs facts and focuses on gauzy detail, like an outfit comprised entirely of lavish accessories and no pants.” —

Bennett on what it’s like to read Weetzie Bat as a teenager, and again as an adult

:’)

Yes. Plus you realize all the girls have eating disorders. 

(Source: emilygould)

Mar 22

[video]

Mar 19

cordjefferson:

Trayvon Martin was a 17-year-old kid walking home from a convenience store with an Arizona Iced Tea and a pack of Skittles last month in Orlando. He’d gotten the snacks for his little brother during a break in the NBA All-Star Game. Martin’s grandparents lived in the gated community he was walking through, but that didn’t stop George Zimmerman, the 28-year-old neighborhood watch captain, from tailing Martin in his car and calling the police to tell them a “suspicious person” was in the area. That also didn’t stop Zimmerman from confronting Martin before the police arrived and then shooting the teenager with his 9-mm handgun. By the time police got there, Martin was dead, and Zimmerman was telling everyone he’d acted in self-defense.
It’s now been weeks since a black kid got killed for doing nothing more than trying to get home to see his family, and police have yet to charge or arrest Zimmerman with a single crime.
Yesterday, hundreds of miles from Orlando, New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly said the best way he knows of to clean up gun violence in New York is by stopping and frisking random men of color on the street, essentially treating them all like they’re suspicious, dangerous, the kind of people who can be menacing with only a pack of Skittles in their pocket.

I listened to this story on NPR this morning and it made me cry. The 911 calls with Zimmerman show that he was warned by a dispatcher to go back to his house, not to follow this “suspicious man” (a.k.a. kid with skittles) but the guy refuses to listen. He was out to be the hero in his twisted, racist fantasy of neighborhood watch duty and now he’s a murderer. I’m disgusted.

cordjefferson:

Trayvon Martin was a 17-year-old kid walking home from a convenience store with an Arizona Iced Tea and a pack of Skittles last month in Orlando. He’d gotten the snacks for his little brother during a break in the NBA All-Star Game. Martin’s grandparents lived in the gated community he was walking through, but that didn’t stop George Zimmerman, the 28-year-old neighborhood watch captain, from tailing Martin in his car and calling the police to tell them a “suspicious person” was in the area. That also didn’t stop Zimmerman from confronting Martin before the police arrived and then shooting the teenager with his 9-mm handgun. By the time police got there, Martin was dead, and Zimmerman was telling everyone he’d acted in self-defense.

It’s now been weeks since a black kid got killed for doing nothing more than trying to get home to see his family, and police have yet to charge or arrest Zimmerman with a single crime.

Yesterday, hundreds of miles from Orlando, New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly said the best way he knows of to clean up gun violence in New York is by stopping and frisking random men of color on the street, essentially treating them all like they’re suspicious, dangerous, the kind of people who can be menacing with only a pack of Skittles in their pocket.

I listened to this story on NPR this morning and it made me cry. The 911 calls with Zimmerman show that he was warned by a dispatcher to go back to his house, not to follow this “suspicious man” (a.k.a. kid with skittles) but the guy refuses to listen. He was out to be the hero in his twisted, racist fantasy of neighborhood watch duty and now he’s a murderer. I’m disgusted.

(via soupsoup)

Mar 14

this is the niagara river

this is the niagara river

Mar 09

xezene:

Interviewer: So basically, we have one main question, and that is – if you have a cause or issue that you care about, what is it?
Wayne Coyne: Oh, I don’t know. I mean, I really try to speak about – because I’m an older guy and a lot of times I’m talking to younger people – I try to remind them to care about the people you are around. So many times when people are young, they look to some future where they’re going to be rich and life is going to be glamorous and it’s going to be more meaningful and be more important than the life that they’re living right now. And I try to remind them that, you know, look – while you are young, it doesn’t mean that this is just a “stopping-point” for something greater. This can be the great moment of your life; the people you are around, the things that you are doing right now, should matter right now. They’re not just some temporary holding pattern and then your life will go on and be great later. You know, live your great life now! Try to be kind to all creatures, humans, and animals; try to be as curious you can about the world because it’s a wonderful place.
A lot of people, especially older people, will try and tell you sometimes that the world is a horrible, brutal, mean place. It is brutal, but it’s also beautiful, and it’s up to you to find that in the world, and if you can – if you are able to – do what you love. If that’s taking care of your family, you should do that. If it’s pursuing art or music, you should do that. If that’s just being in your community and caring about the things that go on around you, you should do that. But if all of us – you know, especially when we’re young, we have an opportunity to start to do something, and the more you start to do something the more you learn about it, the more experience you get, the more people will believe in you. And by the time you get to be an old guy like me, if you’re lucky, you’ll have done something you truly love and you’ll have made that your whole life.
And so, in fact, if there’s anything I can speak of, it’s only from my own experience, that I’ve been lucky that since I was fifteen or sixteen years old, people around me believed in me and said, “Wayne, you should be a guy in a rock band, you’re weird and you love art and you love music, so you should do that!” And I was always encouraged, and so if anything I try and show that again to the world and say, “Believe in yourself! And do what you love,” and all that. But you have to be kind to people, you have to be kind to them – your community – and, you know, you have to remember that that goes with it, it’s not just “I go first.” You know, that’s a great honor to entertain people and to sing songs for people.So yeah, that would be my message.Interviewer: That’s a great message.

xezene:

Interviewer: So basically, we have one main question, and that is – if you have a cause or issue that you care about, what is it?

Wayne Coyne: Oh, I don’t know. I mean, I really try to speak about – because I’m an older guy and a lot of times I’m talking to younger people – I try to remind them to care about the people you are around. So many times when people are young, they look to some future where they’re going to be rich and life is going to be glamorous and it’s going to be more meaningful and be more important than the life that they’re living right now. And I try to remind them that, you know, look – while you are young, it doesn’t mean that this is just a “stopping-point” for something greater. This can be the great moment of your life; the people you are around, the things that you are doing right now, should matter right now. They’re not just some temporary holding pattern and then your life will go on and be great later. You know, live your great life now! Try to be kind to all creatures, humans, and animals; try to be as curious you can about the world because it’s a wonderful place.

A lot of people, especially older people, will try and tell you sometimes that the world is a horrible, brutal, mean place. It is brutal, but it’s also beautiful, and it’s up to you to find that in the world, and if you can – if you are able to – do what you love. If that’s taking care of your family, you should do that. If it’s pursuing art or music, you should do that. If that’s just being in your community and caring about the things that go on around you, you should do that. But if all of us – you know, especially when we’re young, we have an opportunity to start to do something, and the more you start to do something the more you learn about it, the more experience you get, the more people will believe in you. And by the time you get to be an old guy like me, if you’re lucky, you’ll have done something you truly love and you’ll have made that your whole life.

And so, in fact, if there’s anything I can speak of, it’s only from my own experience, that I’ve been lucky that since I was fifteen or sixteen years old, people around me believed in me and said, “Wayne, you should be a guy in a rock band, you’re weird and you love art and you love music, so you should do that!” And I was always encouraged, and so if anything I try and show that again to the world and say, “Believe in yourself! And do what you love,” and all that. But you have to be kind to people, you have to be kind to them – your community – and, you know, you have to remember that that goes with it, it’s not just “I go first.” You know, that’s a great honor to entertain people and to sing songs for people.

So yeah, that would be my message.

Interviewer: That’s a great message.

(via fuckyeahwaynecoyne)